Sermons on Ecclesiastes (Page 2)

Two Are Better Than One (Ecclesiastes 4:7-16)

Introduction Nature’s ceaseless toil > The emptiness of pleasure. Discontentment > Despair/Joy in God’s provision. God’s sovereign orchestration of time. Enjoy your work despite pervasive wickedness and death. Live in contentment despite oppression and envy. Read Ecclesiastes 4:7-16 The vanity of life “under the sun,” no mention of God. This doesn’t mean all of his conclusions are wrong. He makes sense discussing the value of having a partner to share the work and the reward. He also speaks accurately regarding…

Better Off Dead (Ecclesiastes 4:1-6)

Ecclesiastes is a book about searching for meaning in life. It’s about finding purpose. The Preacher assumes the position of King Solomon, one who had great wisdom and great wealth, yet he is unable to find rest in either. Wisdom and wealth cannot provide rest. He considers the endless cycles of nature and concludes that everything is vanity, emptiness. Searching for meaning in life “under the sun” is like chasing after the wind. You won’t find your contentment in work…

Working Among the Wicked (Ecclesiastes 3:16-22)

Introduction In the first two chapters, the Preacher was searching for purpose in wisdom, pleasure, and possessions. He concluded with a call for man to enjoy life. In chapter three, the Preacher has described the various seasons of life, highlighting that God is sovereign over all. After acknowledging God’s superiority to man in the previous passage (3:14-15), the Preacher begins comparing man with the beasts, finding a very important similarity. But, once again, we will see that he comes to…

A Reason for Everything (Ecclesiastes 3:9-15)

Introduction The Preacher began with a search for meaning in wisdom, pleasure, and possessions. In the end he discovered that we should enjoy the life that God has given us. In chapter three, the Preacher began describing various seasons of life. The title of the sermon was “A Season For Everything.” Now, we will see there is “A Reason For Everything” as he begins to analyze those thoughts. Is it possible to be joyful through all of these seasons of…

The Gift of Joy (Ecclesiastes 2:12-26)

  The Preacher is exploring the meaning of life. He has already experimented with two avenues of discovery: wisdom (Ecc. 1:12-18) and pleasure (Ecc. 2:1-11). After coming to the conclusion that neither offered him a deep fulfilling sense of purpose and satisfaction, the Preacher returns to wisdom for a comparison between wisdom and folly. From there, he will consider the vanity of toil. Then, finally, he will come to the solution at the end of the argument (Ecc. 2:24-26). Ecclesiastes…

The Vanity of Hedonism (Ecclesiastes 1:12-2:26)

The Preacher has been making an argument about the vanity of life. When we remove God from the picture and consider life apart from him, everything is meaningless and frustrating. Remember, this entire section from Ecclesiastes 1:12-2:26 is an argument that follows a classic form of speech called “the chase technique.” The Preacher points to several avenues man looks to in search of meaning, and at the very end of his argument he provides the solution. Last week, we zeroed…

The Never Ending Chase (Ecclesiastes 1:12-18)

The Preacher has opened the book with a word about the vanity of life. Everything is meaningless and frustrating when it is viewed from “under the sun”, apart from any reference to God. The key verse from last week was: Ecclesiastes 1:3. He went on to point out how nature is mundane and monotonous. It feeds the sense of ceaseless routine that never amounts to anything. The sun rises and sets, the wind blows around and around, the streams continuously flow,…

All Is Vanity! (Ecclesiastes 1:1-11)

Introduction Open your bibles to the book of Ecclesiastes. We’re kicking off our series looking at the first eleven verses this morning. You will find Ecclesiastes somewhere near the middle of your bibles, following the books of Psalms and Proverbs. While you’re turning there, let me say a brief word about the author. Although historically, Ecclesiastes has been linked to Solomon, there is no mention of his name, unlike Proverbs and Song of Solomon. That alone gave Martin Luther reason…
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